Catching red teams with honeypots part 1: local recon

This post is the first part of a series in which we will cover the concept of using honeypots in a Windows environment as an easy and cost-effective way to detect attacker (or red team) activities. Of course this blog post is about catching real attackers, not just red teams. But we picked this catchy title as the content is based on our red teaming experiences.

Upon mentioning honeypots, a lot of people still think about a system in the network hosting a vulnerable or weakly configured service. However, there is so much more you can do, instead of spawning a system. Think broad: honey files, honey registry keys, honey tokens, honey (domain) accounts or groups, etc.

In this post, we will cover:

  • The characteristics of an effective honeypot.
  • Walkthrough on configuring a file- and registry based honeypots using audit logging and SACLs.
  • Example honeypot strategies to catch attackers using popular local reconnaissance tools such as SeatBelt and PowerUp.
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Direct Syscalls in Beacon Object Files

In this post we will explore the use of direct system calls within Cobalt Strike Beacon Object Files (BOF). In detail, we will:

  • Explain how direct system calls can be used in Cobalt Strike BOF to circumvent typical AV and EDR detections.
  • Release InlineWhispers: a script to make working with direct system calls more easy in BOF code.
  • Provide Proof-of-Concept BOF code which can be used to enable WDigest credential caching and circumvent Credential Guard by patching LSASS process memory.

Source code of the PoC can be found here:

https://github.com/outflanknl/WdToggle

Source code of InlineWhispers can be found here:

https://github.com/outflanknl/InlineWhispers

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RedELK Part 3 – Achieving operational oversight

This is part 3 of a multipart blog series on RedELK: Outflank’s open sourced tooling that acts as a red team’s SIEM and helps with overall improved oversight during red team operations.

In part 1 of this blog series I discussed the core concepts of RedELK and why you should want a tool like this. In part 2 I described a walk-through on integrating RedELK into your red teaming infrastructure. Read those blogs to get a better background understanding of RedELK.

For this blog I’ve setup and compromised a fictitious company. I use the logs from that hack to walk through various options of RedELK. It should make clear why RedELK is really helpful in gaining operational oversight during the campaign.

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Mark-of-the-Web from a red team’s perspective

Zone Identifier Alternate Data Stream information, commonly referred to as Mark-of-the-Web (abbreviated MOTW), can be a significant hurdle for red teamers and penetration testers, especially when attempting to gain an initial foothold.

Your payload in the format of an executable, MS Office file or CHM file is likely to receive extra scrutiny from the Windows OS and security products when that file is marked as downloaded from the internet. In this blog post we will explain how this mechanism works and we will explore offensive techniques that can help evade or get rid of MOTW.

Note that the techniques described in this blog post are not new. We have witnessed all of them being abused in the wild. Hence, this blog post serves to raise awareness on these techniques for both red teamers (for more realistic adversary simulations) and blue teamers (for better countermeasures and understanding of attacker techniques).

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Red Team Tactics: Advanced process monitoring techniques in offensive operations

In this blog post we are going to explore the power of well-known process monitoring utilities and demonstrate how the technology behind these tools can be used by Red Teams within offensive operations.

Having a good technical understanding of the systems we land on during an engagement is a key condition for deciding what is going to be the next step within an operation. Collecting and analysing data of running processes from compromised systems gives us a wealth of information and helps us to better understand how the IT landscape from a target organisation is setup. Moreover, periodically polling process data allows us to react on changes within the environment or provide triggers when an investigation is taking place.

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